Focus

This post has very little to say, but I need to write it anyway. It’s a long ramble about where I’m at now, and where I want to be. So, that little video game project didn’t pan out so great in the end. But you know what, that’s okay. I learned a lot about Python, Curses, and getting […]

Rogue Detective Part 2 – Curses!

Last time, we covered the rather ridiculous choices that led up to my decision to write a roguelike from scratch. Now, we’ll cover the first steps in the creation of Rogue Detective, and indeed, most games I write. After the standard step of creating a new repository for source control comes the creation of the […]

Rogue Detective Part 1 – A Defective Rogue

Rogue Detective started off as an attempt at the annual 7 Day Roguelike competition, wherein one aspires to create a full roguelike in a mere seven days. Entrants are allowed to use previous work, provided the final game is a new roguelike unto itself. This year, the competition fell in one of the two weeks […]

Getting Virtual with Emacs (Part 3)

Last time, we talked about the two emacs extensions I use to emulate my most used features of Sublime Text. Even a cursory look at the manual would show way more features than I even thought about using, but by learning basic editing in emacs I’m already able to fully switch over to the Gnu editor. […]

Getting Virtual with Emacs (Part 2)

It’s been just over a month since I started properly developing in emacs, both at work and at home. I think it’s about time I wrote a little about my experiences. First of all, while I’ve used vim daily at work, I don’t claim to be a vim power-user by any stretch of the imagination. […]

Getting Virtual with Emacs (Part 1)

A Quick Introduction We’re taking a short (okay, long) break from the Hullet Bells posts. It’s already been a couple of months since I last updated, mostly because progress has been slow. I keep having ideas on how to refactor the fledging script system, but never get around to actually implementing them. So that’s on […]

The Hullet Bells – Part 5 (Valuing your Input)

What is Input Handling, anyway? Handling input is the process of taking the player’s key presses and converting them to actions in game. Pygame supports two methods for doing this: 1) Examining the state of the keyboard directly each frame, which I’ll refer to as the key state method. 2) Key events, where the game […]

The Hullet Bells – Part 4 (Insert Title Here)

The title screen! At this point in game development, it’s probably a waste of time, especially if you’ve already decided to implement a handler system that will let you slot the title screen in at the end. But what’s done is done, so here it is! Obviously a work of art. In this post, I’d […]

The Hullet Bells – Part 3 (Handling It)

Handling transitions between various screens was one of the problems my friends and I encountered when developing our shmup game at university. For instance, it was a pain getting the game flow moving from the title screen to the game screen, from game screen to loading screen, and so on. Because of the way we […]

The Hullet Bells – Part 2 (Getting Organised)

Recently I embarked upon a quest: a quest to produce a platform game, the likes of which the world had never known. However, I got bored of that, but not before exercising my Python chops. Although I failed, I discovered the wonderful pygame library. Pygame is a Python wrapper for the ever-popular C++ SDL library, […]